Who’s Handling Your Dog? – The National Occupational Standards for the Dog Industry

Who’s Handling Your Dog? – The National Occupational Standards for the Dog Industry

The Way of the Dog has taken on several behavioural cases where the root cause has been linked to the activities and actions of, and handling by individuals and businesses paid to take care of or train the dog.

In all of theses cases the evidence suggests a clear and worrying lack of qualification, experience, and knowledge on the part of those individuals and businesses.

From a dog owners point of view, we are unwittingly placing our trust in individuals and businesses who are working outside the limits of their own authority, accreditation, qualification, expertise and experience.

This article has been written to supply dog owners who are seeking the services of any dog based service (where your dog is handled, managed or cared for by somebody other than the dog’s owner) with the recognised minimum standards expected of the service provider.

National Occupational Standards for Dog Handlers

Why do we need standards and regulation?

Pet care in the UK is a multi-million pound industry. This has tempted many individuals to give up main stream professions in pursuit of their dream job, such as working with dogs. This has led to a rise in the various types of dog services available.

Due to a lack of regulation and no defined standards, there have been no barriers for likely entrepreneurs to cross.  On the outside such services might seem like a blessing for those in need of support and assistance; however the variation in standards and lack of regulation is a real concern.

Have you ever stopped to think about who is handling your dog and questioned their ability to do so? Are they qualified and are they adhering to any professional standards? How would you know the standards they are expected to achieve?

With the release of the National Occupational Standards for the Dog Industry, you now have the tools to address these questions.

National Occu[pational Standards

The National Occupational Standards

in the imageIn October 2014, Lantra (sponsored by Government) released the following National Occupational Standards (NOS) following consultation with organisations including the Pet Education Training and Behaviour Council, the Kennel Club, the Canine and Feline Behaviour Association, British Institute of Professional Dog Trainers, Guild of Dog Trainers, and the Cambridge Institute for Dog Behaviour and Training.

The NOS aim to promote criteria that are relevant, accurate, and considered a suitable benchmark for those working with dogs (Lantra, 2014).

In each NOS there is a list of ‘Performance Criteria’ of which the individual professional must be able to demonstrate in addition to a list of ‘Knowledge and Understanding’ that they need to essentially know and understand. The ultimate purpose of these standards is to support the primary aim of protecting the welfare of dogs and to recognise that dogs as a species require a separate NOS and not an all-encompassing approach as set out in Animal Welfare standards.

Each of the NOS documents is available to view, download and print below.

  • LANCTB1 – Observe, Assess and Respond to the Behaviour of Dogs
  • LANCTB2 – Handle and Control Dogs
  • LANCTB3 – Plan and Implement Training Programmes for Dogs
  • LANCTB4 – Plan and Implement Training Programmes for Dogs and Handlers
  • LANCTB5 – Plan and Implement Programmes to Address Undesirable Behaviour in Dogs

NOS for the Dog Industry

Who do the National Occupational Standards apply to?

The standards are relevant to all those who work professionally with dogs such as veterinary paraprofessionals, groomers, walkers and day carers, trainers and behaviourists, those providing therapies of any kind, micro chippers, and by and large anyone who works with dogs on behalf of the public.

The standards documented in LANCTB1 and 2 are aimed at every single person within the dog industry who works with or handles dogs. Any person offering or providing dog training must achieve and adhere to the standards of LANCTB1-4, whilst dog behaviourists must achieve and adhere to LANCTB1-5.

Our View

At The Way of the Dog we feel that all those that choose to work with dogs should be familiar with the National Occupational Standards and aware of the criteria relevant to their practice.

Although the NOS are not currently enforced and only serve as guidelines to those working in the industry they – at the very least – give all dog owners a standard practice of which they can expect to receive if paying for dog services of any kind whether professional or amateur.

The truth of the matter is that many individuals and businesses within the dog industry are falling short of these standards and their lack of qualification, experience and knowledge are having a detrimental effect on the well being, health and behaviour of the dogs in their care.

We would urge all dog owners to read the NOS documents linked above and use them to assess their current and future dog care, training and behaviour service providers. You should address any concerns by asking that provider how they adhere to any particular standard and be happy with their responses.

A good service provider will be happy to address your concerns and pleased that you care for your dogs well being.

Do you have questions or comments about NOS?

Do you have any questions or comments about the National Occupational Standards and their implications. Do you wish to respond to this post? If so, use the comment section below and we’ll respond with our views.

 

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Transporting Dogs Safely

Transporting Dogs Safely

I recently heard a story featuring a car journey, an unsecured dog and an electric window switch; put these 3 elements together and the potential for catastrophe doesn’t bare thinking about. Thankfully, quick thinking and fast reactions prevented this tale from realising its scary potential.

Since hearing of this incident, I’ve noticed something that I hadn’t realised was quite so prevalent; dogs are being transported insecurely on Britain’s roads, putting the dog, the owner and others at risk.

Here’s our guide to transporting you dog safely….
Transporting an animal in the UK is subject to certain laws and regulations.

The Welfare of Animals (Transport) Order states that:
‘No person shall transport any animal in a way which causes or is likely to cause injury or unnecessary suffering to that animal.’

In addition to this

The Highway Code states that:
‘When in a vehicle make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you if you stop quickly’.

This means that your dog must be transported in a way the will cause it no harm and will reduce the level of harm inflicted in the event of an accident. It must also be restrained from interfering with your driving and remove the risk of injury to passengers in the event of an accident.

The RAC Pet Insurance study of 2014 revealed that 4% of pet owners have had an accident, or a near miss, as a result of a pet being loose in their car. While the majority agree that it is a hazard to allow a dog to be loose in a vehicle, 28% said they would let their dog move freely. Also of concern is that 21% usually leave their dogs unsecured on car seats.

My observations would suggest that these are very conservative figures. This isn’t surprising as many owners wouldn’t want to admit to endangering their pets or breaking the law. Many are simply unaware of how to abide by these laws and regulations fully.

The remainder of this article covers some of the options available to dog owners for securing their pets whilst in a vehicle. Your decision will depend on vehicle type, budget and personal preference; here are a few options available on the market today.

Vehicle Pet Crates

Vehicle crates offer the most secure method of transportation, provided that it is sturdy and secured in place.

By placing your dog in a crate you remove any risk of it interfering with the driver and of it entering the passenger area in the event of an accident; it will however still hit the sides of the crate in the event of an accident, but it’s travelling distance will be relatively small.

You should choose a crate that can be secured with straps or bolts; it’s size will depend on the size of your dog. Your dog should be able to stand up and comfortably turn around. To increase comfort you can add a non-slip cushioned mat.

The negatives associated with crates usually relate to their cost, size, weight and the time taken to fit and remove them.

Car Pet Cages / Barriers

Pet car cages and barriers offer all of the same benefits as car crates, but the negatives are extenuated.

Your dog will not be able to interfere with the driver’s attention and will be secured from being projected through the passenger cabin in the event of a crash. There is however more space to travel inside a cage in the event of a crash; this will increase the risk of injury.

As with pet crates, you should choose a crate that can be secured with straps or bolts; it’s size will depend on the size of your dog. Your dog should be able to stand up and comfortably turn around. To increase comfort you can add a non-slip cushioned mat.

Once again, their size and time taken to fit and remove can be seen as a negative.

Pet Carriers

Smaller dogs may be transported in pet carriers on short journeys. These offer the same benefits as a car crate, providing they are sturdy and crash tested.

These carriers offer the benefit of being movable and lower in cost than a crate, but should only be used for small dogs. You should choose a carrier that can be secured with straps, harnesses or seat belts. Your dog should be able to stand up and comfortably turn around. To increase comfort you can add a non-slip mat.

Dog Safety Harnesses

Dog harnesses attach your dog to a fixed point in your car to prevent him/her from interfering with the driver. A good dog harness will also prevent your dog being propelled from it’s seat in the event of an accident.

A dog harness system is a good choice for those with small cars, saloon cars or those who do not wish to fill their vehicle with hardware. These systems aren’t as secure as a crate or cage, but typically cost less.

You should choose a harness with the correct rating for your size/weight of dog.

Making the Right Decision

Each of these restraint systems have their own pros and cons; what is suitable for one owner may not be suitable for another. But there are consistent concerns and checks for each.

  • You should always check the suitability of each option for your dog and your vehicle.
  • The variety in quality and suitability in all of these product ranges is vast – from poor to excellent. You should spend time researching them and reading reviews.
  • You should research how any particular product has rated in crash tests for dogs of the same weight as your own. If a manufacturer is unable to give such information, it is prudent to assume that tests have not been completed and that the product may not be a suitable restraint in the event of an accident.
  • You should weigh and measure your dog before purchasing any of the products to ensure the correct size/style is purchased.
  • These systems should be fitted by an expert where possible.
  • These systems should be regularly monitored for wear and tear and continued suitability.

 More Safety Considerations

In addition to restraining your dog you should:

  • Assess if your dog is fit to travel.
  • Ensure that the dog has adequate ventilation.
  • Ensure that the dog is shaded from direct sunlight.
  • Monitor your dog for signs of overheating.
  • On long journeys, ensure that the dog has regular access to water.
  • If transported in the passenger cabin apply any child safety systems e.g. window locks, child safety locks, fit window guards.
  • If transported on the boot of a hatchback, SUV, van ensure that back doors are fully closed and cages or crates do not contact the windows or doors.
  • Never leave your dog unattended in a car.

Information provided by the government regarding the welfare of dogs during journeys can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/69549/pb10308-dogs-cats-welfare-060215.pdf

Contribution by Matthew@Heppiness

How to Approach a Dog

How to Approach a Dog

Throughout 2015, we will regularly release blog and media items that relate to educating readers, but more particularly children, in how to live in harmony with dogs that enter their lives. This article is aimed at providing parents, carers and teachers with the information required to teach children how to approach a dog.

Why teach a child how to approach a dog?

Children have no natural fear of animals, only learnt ones; they do however possess a natural curiosity about animals. Most children have positive encounters with dogs; these positive encounters create associations and learned behaviours. Teach a child how to approach a dog

Here’s a fictional example.

Little Mary’s gran has a dog called Fido who is balanced and socialised. All of their time together is controlled and managed, as a result they have a great relationship based on mutual trust and friendship. Mary can hug Fido, feed him treats and play with his doggy toys. All of little Mary‘s experiences of dogs have been with Fido; they have all been positive and as a result she is very enthusiastic about petting dogs.

Based on the above, can little Mary be expected to approach and interact with other dogs in the same way she does with Fido?

The answer is unequivocally NO.

Little Mary has created an association between dogs and good experiences. She has also learned that dogs can have their space invaded and that she can give and/or withdraw their food and possessions. She will continue to approach and interact with all dogs in the way she does with Fido. In most cases this will be fine, but in some she may be at serious risk of being bitten by an unsocialised, nervous or possessive dog. All children must be taught how to approach, read and pet dogs safely.

A step-by-step guide to approaching dogs

The first thing to teach a child is that all dogs are different; some dogs are confident, happy and well socialised, whilst others can be scared, nervous and unpredictable. Some are happy and confident in some situations, yet scared and nervous in others. Therefore, each dog’s response to being approached will be different. Let the dog approach you Below you’ll find a step-by-step guide to teaching children how to approach a dog. These each step relate to the poster that is attached below. This poster can be downloaded and printed to display in a child’s bedroom, a school classroom or printed as a handout. Please use the poster and the lesson text together as a complete teaching aid. You should teach your child to follow each of these steps every time they approach a dog:

  • Never approach a dog that is not under it’s owners control – This includes dogs that are off lead in the park, dogs that are tied up outside shops or schools or even your neighbours dog in the front garden.
  • Always ask the owners permission before approaching a dog – Be calm and polite when asking permission. Do not excite the dog. A dog’s owner will know how their dog reacts to being approached. If the owner says “No” you should thank the owner and walk away calmly.
  • Let the dog come to you – If the owner agrees to being approached, gently offer a hand in the direction of the dog. If the dog wants to meet you it will come and sniff your hand. If the dog doesn’t come to you it probably doesn’t want to be petted, you should thank the owner and walk away calmly.
  • Read the dog’s signals – A dog cannot talk, but it can give very clear signals to tell you if it is comfortable with your approach. Before you start to pet the dog you should look for the following signals:
    Positive (Good) Signals: Wagging tail, open mouthed, tongue out, rubbing against you, sitting or lying beside you, climbing up your leg.
    Negative (Bad) Signals: Moving away from you, cowering or retracting from you, barking, showing their teeth, tail tucked between back legs, tail up and curved over like a scorpion’s tail, fur along the ridge of back standing up.
    If you are receiving only positive signals you can move on to petting the dog. You should continue to monitor these signals throughout your interaction with the dog. If at any point you see any of the negative signals you should slowly step back from the dog, thank the owner and walk calmly away.
  • Petting the dog – Dogs should be approached for stroking from the side. Gently stroke the fur on their back in a head to tail direction or in the area of the dog’s chest between it’s collar and front legs.
    Never lean over the top of a dog. Never stroke the top of a dog’s head. Never pull on or play with a dog’s tail or ears. Never grab or hug a dog
    You should continue to read the dog’s signals throughout your interaction. If at any point you see any of the negative signals you should slowly step back from the dog, thank the owner and walk calmly away.
  • Say “thank you” – After petting the dog slowly step back from the dog, thank the owner and the dog and walk away calmly.

Download this text as a pdf to print and use when teaching your child How to Approach Dogs – Lesson Text

Teach a child to approach a dogDownload this poster as a pdf to print and use whilst teaching your child or to display in your home How to approach a dog – Poster

Practice and reinforce

By following the above steps to introducing a child to a dog, you are creating a new learnt behaviour. You should teach your child to follow these steps each and every time they approach a dog, even if it is your own dog in your own house for 2 reasons:

  • Repetition reinforces the new behaviour to a point where it becomes natural. Your child subconsciously become a good reader of a dog’s signals and be able to assess the risks in approaching it.
  • A dog’s reaction to being approached will change depending on many factors. A dog you approached and stroked on your way into the park may have had a fight with another dog and become scared and nervous whilst you had a picnic. A dog you see and stroke every day may be feeling unwell and not want to be stroked. As a result, you should always restart the steps if you wished to re-approach a dog.

We hope this guide provides you with the tools required to teach your child how to approach a dog.

We are keen to hear your views and comments on the above article, please feel free to add them below.

Contribution by Matthew at Heppiness

Dog Walking in the Dark – Be Seen, Be Safe, Keep Warm

Dog Walking in the Dark – Be Seen, Be Safe, Keep Warm

Most dog breeds were bred to work for a living and a particular purpose, like hunting, herding or providing protection. Wild dogs scavenge and hunt, care for offspring, defend territory and play with each other. They lead busy, complex lives, interacting socially and solving simple problems necessary for their survival.

Modern “pet” dogs no longer receive this level of stimulation and spend much of their time confined, alone and/or inactive. As a dog owner, you have a responsibility to fill this void.

Many of the dogs seen by The Way of The Dog have behavioural issues that are a consequence of lack of stimulation, interaction and daily exercise. This is most prevalent in the winter months, when dark mornings and evenings combine with cold (and often wet) weather to dissuade dog owners from providing the quality of exercise their dog requires. Every dog needs good quality daily exercise; this is a basic fact of dog ownership and should have been considered when bringing a dog into your life.

Lack of daylight and adverse weather conditions should not affect the levels of exercise you give your dog.

Be Seen, Stay Safe, Keep Warm

Staying safe on dark walks is as simple as being visible, being aware and wrapping up warm. Here are a few of our tips to help you and your dog stay safe and warm on your winter walks.

Be Seen

  • Use a Hi-Vis reflective or led light lead and collar on your dog.
  • Wear a Hi-Vis reflective vest over your coat.
  • Carry a torch or use a headlamp.
  • Avoid unlit roads.
  • Avoid roads that have no pavement.
  • If you cannot avoid roads without a pavement, walk on the right hand side (towards the traffic) with your dog to your right (on the opposite side to the traffic).

Be Safe

  • Keep your dog on the lead.
  • Use well lit walks that you are familiar with.
  • Consider taking your dog in the car to a well lit safe area.
  • Do you have a neighbour with a dog? Arrange to walk together.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings; leave your headphones at home.
  • Carry a mobile phone

Keep Warm

  • Bad weather requires appropriate clothing; a warm waterproof jacket, waterproof overtrousers, warm sturdy footwear, a hat and a good pair of gloves are the bare essentials.
  • It is our experience that the best quality outdoor coat and boots should be purchased according to your budget.
  • Consider your dog’s breed, age and health to decide if they require additional insulation.
  • Keep moving; if you stand still you’ll feel the chill.

Other Winter Considerations

We have previously written an article that outlines some of the hazards to your dog’s safety and wellbeing in winter, which can be viewed at www.thewayofthedog.co.uk/winter-care-for-dogs/. We’d recommend that you read this as some of the points raised could save your dog’s life.

The Alternatives

If you still feel unable to give your dog the exercise and stimulation it needs, there are a few things you could consider.

  • Finding a way to change the times that you walk your dog.
  • Enlisting the help of family members and friends.
  • Employing a reputable, licensed, 1 to 1 dog walker.
  • Rehoming your dog.

Article by Heppiness

Winter Care for Dogs

Winter Care for Dogs

Winter is a fabulous time to take your dog out for a walk; the fresh air will do you both good. But as the mercury drops in the thermometer, certain health hazards are created that every dog owner needs to be aware of.

At The Way of the Dog, we do not aim to sensationalise issues or scaremonger. Our articles are focused on our experiences in dog world and informing dog owners of how best to maintain the health and wellbeing of their canine friend. This article is intended to inform you of possible risks to your dog’s health.

Dog Health Hazards in Winter

Anti-Freeze

A common winter related ailment in dogs is anti-freeze poisoning. Anti-freeze contains the toxin ethylene glycol, which is sweet and irresistible to dogs. They’ll lick up drips from leaking car coolant systems and brake systems or drink from contaminated puddles and other water sources.

It does not take a significant amount of ethylene glycol to cause fatal damage to a dog, as low as 2-3ml per pound of the dog’s weight.

Dog owners should:

  • NEVER decant anti-freeze into another container.
  • Store anti-freeze in a secure place with lids securely closed.
  • Check cars for leaks and if found get them fixed.
  • Check their driveways, parking spaces and garages for contamination.
  • Use a funnel when topping up anti-freeze to reduce spills.
  • Dispose of old/unused anti-freeze at an approved waste management facility.

Anti-freeze poisoning occurs in two phases. In the first phase, the animal typically appears lethargic, disoriented, uncoordinated and groggy. Symptoms usually appear 30 minutes to one hour after ingestion and can last for several hours.

The second phase, which can last up to three days, is characterized by symptoms such as vomiting, oral and gastric ulcers, kidney failure, coma and death.

For dogs exposed to antifreeze, the first few hours are critical. They should see a vet as soon as antifreeze ingestion is suspected.

Rock Salt

Rock salt used to grit roads and paths in winter can be a danger to dogs if they lick it from their paws or fur. Even small amounts of pure salt can be dangerous, but the exact quantities of salt in rock salt are variable. Most cases are a result of a dog licking it’s paws and fur after walking through a salted area. The salt irritates the skin and paws and the dog is simply attempting to remove the irritation.

Dog owners should:

  • Avoid using rock salt in areas their dogs walk in their own gardens.
  • Avoid heavily salted areas in public.
  • Rinse and dry their dog after winter walks (always rinse down the body and legs, pay attention to and in-between pads).
  • Be aware of excessive paw licking after a winter walk.

Ingestion can result in a high blood sodium concentration which can cause thirst, vomiting and lethargy, and in severe cases there is a risk of convulsions and kidney damage.

Any dog suspected to have ingested rock salt must be seen by a vet.

The Cold

Older dogs, small breed dogs, dogs with short fur and puppies can be especially sensitive to the cold weather. Dogs with diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances may have a harder time regulating their body temperature, and may be more susceptible to problems from temperature extremes. In addition, all dogs can be susceptible to frostbite and hypothermia if conditions are cold enough and/or the length of exposure is long enough.

Dog owners should:

  • Assess the type and age of dog and it’s susceptibility to the cold by consulting a vet.
  • Purchase and use suitable protection based on this assessment.
  • Monitor their dog regularly when exercising them in cold weather.
  • NEVER leave your dog outside unsupervised without a heated shelter.

If your pet is whining, shivering, seems anxious, slows down or stops moving, seems weak, or starts looking for warm places to burrow, get them back inside quickly because they are showing signs of hypothermia. Frostbite is harder to detect, and may not be fully recognized until a few days after the damage is done.

If you suspect your dog has hypothermia or frostbite, consult your vet immediately.

Snow

Many dogs love a bit of snow. The mixture of curiosity and the sensations involved can lead many dogs to appear excited and exuberant. This maybe the case, but snow can also conceal a few doggy perils.

Whilst many of the risks posed by snow to a dog’s wellbeing are the result of the cold, there are a few extra points to consider.

Dog owners should:

  • Cut the hair between a dogs pads. These hairs trap snow that can ball into a small ice-cube nestled between the pads. If your dog refuses to move or appears lame on a snowy day, check pads first.
  • Remove snow and ice build up from a dog’s pads, legs and under carriage regularly to prevent it freezing to ice as this becomes painful.
  • If this snow build up becomes ice, remove with a warm (not hot) damp cloth.
  • Be aware of snow drifts, banks and cornices.
  • Monitor their dog regularly when exercising them in the snow.

If you suspect your dog has hypothermia or frostbite, consult your vet immediately.

Ice

When walking your dog, stay away from frozen ponds, lakes and other water. Dogs will often attempt to walk on ice with no concept of the thickness of ice or there being water below. If they were to fall through the ice, some breeds of dog will succumb to the effects of the cold and then drown in a matter of seconds.

Dog owners should:

  • Avoid areas with frozen bodies of water.
  • If in the vicinity of a frozen body of water, keep your dog on a lead.
  • If your dog ventures onto a frozen body of water, coax them back without causing panic.
  • If your dog falls through ice, attempt to coax them back to land or use material nearby to provide an aid to exiting the water (buoyancy aids, a fallen branch, a fence panel, etc).
  • If you retrieve your dog, get them dry and warm as soon as possible.
  • NEVER enter the water to rescue your dog. More than 50 per cent of ice-related drownings involved an attempted rescue of another person or a dog (ROSPA).

If your dog has entered a frozen body of water and you suspect your dog has hypothermia or any other ailments, consult your vet immediately.

Enjoy the Winter Together

I know, it sounds like we’ve got our health and safety clipboard out and banned you and your dog having any fun together in the winter; this isn’t the case.

At The Way of the Dog we actively encourage the (at least) daily exercising of your dog, whatever the weather. Follow the points we’ve made and you will have minimised any risk to your dog’s health and wellbeing during one of the most spectacular times of the year.

Contribution by Heppiness
Image credits Scott Costello Flikr

Keep Your Dog Safe This Christmas

Keep Your Dog Safe This Christmas

Keep Your Dog Safe This Christmas

As we “Deck the halls with boughs of holly” this Christmas, we bring a whole host of decorations and food into our homes. This brightens up those gloomy winter evenings and provides a bit of Christmas  cheer; but we are inadvertently bringing a whole host of potential dangers and poisons into the lives of our dogs. With careful consideration, we can reduce the risks that Christmas decorations and food pose to our canine friends. Here are some things to consider over the holiday period.

The Christmas Tree & Seasonal Plants

  • The sap of a fir tree has a low level of toxicity if consumed by your dog, resulting in vomiting and/or diarrhoea . The sap is present in the wood and needles of your Christmas tree.
  • Fir needles can cause irritation to your dogs paws. If consumed, many are sharp enough to perforate a dog’s intestine. Vacuum daily to reduce this risk and keep the tree watered to reduce the fall of needles.
  • The water in your tree stand will contain sap and any additive you use to make the tree last longer. Keep your water covered and do not allow your dog to drink this water.
  • Baubles and tinsel may be of interest to your dog. Many baubles shatter on compression, producing sharp shards the pose a danger if stood on, chewed or consumed. Tinsel presents a very real choking hazard.
  • Chocolate decorations on a Christmas tree are very tempting to your dog. Chocolate can be toxic to your dog, plus many of these type of decoration are wrapped in foil which can become trapped in your dog’s intestine if consumed.
  • Light wires present a trip hazard which can destabilise your tree. There is also the danger of electrocution through chewing live wires.
  • Holly, mistletoe and poinsettia are all toxic to dogs and may cause vomiting and/or diarrhoea. Keep them out of reach and be aware of fallen leaves and berries.

If your pet has chewed on the Christmas tree or other seasonal plants, monitor for any changes of behavior (excessive licking, salivating), changes in appetite and water consumption, changes in activity levels, the onset of vomiting and/or diarrhoea. If any of these changes are present always consult your vet.

Decorations

Whilst we have covered the dangers presented by baubles, tinsel and seasonal plants; other decorations pose a threat to you dog.

  • Low level candles pose a threat to your dog though burns, but also pose a fire risk if knocked over.
  • Ingestion of ornaments can cause gastrointestinal blockage or rupture. Depending on what materials were used to make the ornament, toxicity may result if ingested.
  • Many lights or mechanical decorations use batteries. All batteries are potentially toxic. If a battery is chewed and pierced it can cause chemical burns and heavy metal poisoning. If they are swallowed whole it is possible they will cause a blockage.

If your pet has ingested any of your Christmas decorations always consult your vet.

Food & Drink

We all love a bit of Christmas food, but much of our traditional fare presents a very real danger to our dogs. We also tend to tempt them a little more than usual; a tub of chocolate under the tree, a bowl of nuts on the hearth or a plate of mince pies on the coffee table. All of these things can be poisonous to our 4 legged friend.

  • Raisins are in lots of foods at Christmas (mince pies, fruit cakes, Christmas pudding, etc.) and their consumption presents a potential health threat to dogs. Their toxicity can lead to vomiting, diarrhoea and in some cases kidney failure.
  • Certain types of nuts can cause toxic poisoning, an upset stomach or an obstruction in your dog’s gastrointestinal tract.
  • Chocolate intoxication is commonly seen around the Christmas holidays. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death.
  • Dogs are far more sensitive to alcohol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant intoxication. Alcohol intoxication commonly causes vomiting, loss of coordination, disorientation and stupor. In severe cases, coma, seizures and death may occur.
  • Christmas dinner is for humans, not dogs. There are many ingredients in your average Christmas dinner that contain compounds that are toxic to dogs. Your stuffing may contain nuts, onions and garlic; your Christmas pudding contains nuts, raisins and alcohol.
  • Turkey bones should NEVER be given to your pet. Cooked boned splinter; any sharp point on a bone can scrape and cut your dog’s gastrointestinal tract from the esophagus down to the rectum, causing damage on its way in or out. A sharp bone can even cause a perforation in your dog’s intestine. Bones may also get stuck in part of the tract and cause a blockage that does not allow food to pass.

If your dog consumes any of the above items and displays any symptoms always consult your vet.

Have a Wonderful Christmas With Your Dog

There are plenty of treats available at pet shops and other retailers that are pet safe, so don’t be tempted into feeding them something that may do them harm this Christmas. All your dog wants for Christmas is some time with you and a good long walk.

Merry Christmas from all at The Way of the Dog.

Contribution by Heppiness

Image credit Angie McKaig Flikr

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